Jody Sticker

Daddy B. Nice's #99 ranked Southern Soul Artist



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"Five Minutes"

Jody Sticker

Composed by Gerry Roberts


November 19, 2010: NEW ALBUM ALERT

Bargain-Priced Make It Move CD

Comparison-Priced Make It Move CD

Read Daddy B. Nice's Review of Jody Sticker's Make It Move CD (Scroll down to Tidbits #5.

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See "Tidbits" below for the latest updates on Jody Sticker.

To automatically link to Jody Sticker's charted radio singles, awards, CD's and other references, go to "Sticker, Jody" in Daddy B. Nice's Comprehensive Index.

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Daddy B. Nice's Original Critique:

It's about time, as we near the end of our journey through Daddy B. Nice's top 100 Southern Soul artists, to celebrate the R-rated side of Southern Soul. To "fess up" to the mainstream masses that yes, sometimes a chitlin' circuit song is just too full of objectionable material to get played on commercial radio.

To even consider adult material an issue in the age of rap, when the problem of R-rated language is solved by censoring certain words and phrases, seems absurd. But Southern Soul music is less about obscene language than it is about adult themes: entire verse-and-chorus songs built around a sexual metaphor, the most obvious example, of course, being Clarence Carter's seminal Southern Soul hit, "Strokin'," a no-holds-barred testimonial to "doin' it," as LL Cool J would say.

What does one censor in "Strokin'"? There is no graphic language per se. You'd have to censor the entire song, because it's a lewd, unrepentant and unashamed celebration of a graphic subject, graphic theme and graphic image.

Don't misunderstand. Southern Soul music professionals as a whole do hold themselves to a higher moral standard than their hiphop counterparts. Graphic violence and misogyny, for example, are unheard of.

Much of Southern Soul's ambivalence about its own "wild side" has to do with Gospel. The huge majority of Southern Soul performers grew up going to church and excelling at gospel music, and once they become secular performers, most Southern Soul artists still want to be associated with God and the Deity's friends here on earth, even as they ply the Devil's side of the tracks called rhythm and blues. They don't call it the "Bible Belt" for "nothin'."

But even as Southern Soul as an "industry" stresses the humanity and balanced nature of its adult themes, its practitioners--from the old masters like Carter, Marvin Sease and Bobby Rush to the young guns like Sheba Potts-Wright and Theodis Ealey--offer sex on stage every night in small, steamy rooms on the chitlin' circuit. It's everything you'd dream about in your fantasies of finding the ultimate "hole in the wall": sweating dancers, smoke, liquor and hormones all swirling around a larger-than life performer unafraid to front for sexual healing.

On any given night that performer might be a two-hundred-pound-plus man butt-ass naked except for a gold satin diaper. It might be a sexagenarian diva like Dorothy Moore spewing profanity that would make a construction worker blush. Or it might be Jody Sticker, with his lewd performing name, flanked by giant phallic symbols.

You can look at this from a moral point of view, or you can look at it from an economic point of view. The economic reality is that people are poor on the chitlin' circuit. They work hard for what they get, and that is often very little. And when they put down precious dollars to blow off a little steam on a Friday or Saturday night, they want to be entertained, and the more humorous and scandalous the performance, the better to tell one's friends and neighbors about later. ("You know what that crazy so-and-so did? . . . ")

Which brings up an interesting cart-before-the-horse question. Was it the isolation forced upon it by the mainstream music industry that fostered the "stroking" and "candy-licking" and "cheatin' in the next room" of Southern Soul music? Or was it the chitlin' circuit lewdness that brought about the isolation?

Chitlin' circuit R&B has been marginalized for more than thirty years--since (roughly speaking) Bobby "Blue" Bland's last great pop hit, "Ain't Nothin' You Can Do," Al Green's "Let's Stay Together" and Brook Benton's "Rainy Night In Georgia". So long, in fact, that hardly anyone today remembers when adult R&B was an integral part of mainstream pop in America.

Yet, believe it or not, today's Southern Soul is the stronger for it musically. Why? Because the apartheid forced Southern R&B artists into a tight-knit community. A community, it might be added, that was already unified and culturally isolated by its relative poverty (a glimpse of which modern Americans finally saw in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina). That isolation created a lot of musical freedom for those musicians tough enough and fortunate enough to keep their careers going. Thus, one could argue that adult R&B (which has blossomed into today's Southern Soul) actually benefited--artistically, at any rate--by its marginalization.


Certainly, the Southern Soul audience benefits. You won't find much red-blooded, American sex in "disco" or "cool jazz" or "adult-alternative" or what passes for "rock" these days.

Jody Sticker's "Five Minutes," ironically enough, is a very tame version of this sexual prevalence. Indeed, "Five Minutes" may be the most "suburban" Southern Soul record pressed to date (about which, more in a minute).

A more fitting example of the Sticker emphasis on sex is "Hickory Log" (also from Sticker's debut CD, 5 Minutes). Here the subject is exactly what the title suggests, a big piece of "wood" capable of rendering a willing woman speechless. It's a "slow-burning" log.

"Hickory log can burn all night,
And still be smoking hot
In the morning light."

The song will remind Southern Soul aficionados of Vickie Baker's "Tootsie Roll" (modified to "Tussy Roll" to avoid trademark issues), another graphic metaphor that leaves nothing to the imagination. And the vocal by Sticker will remind fans of Sorrento Ussery's breathy, sinuous singing style--a crooner's medium very different from the bafflingly flawed yet perfect-for-the-song technique Sticker uses in his signature hit, "Five Minutes."

So what is it about "Five Minutes"? This is a song that works on so many different levels it's hard to say whether it's more about sex or today's merciless bondage to the clock.

"I said I want to make love,
You say we didn't have time.
Say your friends will be here in an hour.
You don't want to get caught."

"Five Minutes" goes by faster than a track by the Ramones. You're amazed to find the time of the record lasts three-plus minutes. Interspersed with the understated melody (buttressed by a fine horn chorus) is the banter of two suburbanites arguing about whether there is time for a "quickie" before the company arrives.

"Baby, why don't you call 'em?"

"We ain't got enough time."

"You know they got to come all the way across town. And you know they're going to stop and get some chicken wings."

"We ain't got enough time."

"We got a little time. It'll be a whole hour before they get here."

Jody sings the track in the off-hand, understated style of an Adult-Alternative star like Beck or Tricky, which both adds to the recording's charm and reinforces the atmosphere of 9-to-5 monotony, commuting and fragile social ties that form the couple's life.

At the end Jody's woman, exhausted by the arguing, finally gives in with a sarcastic reply.

"If you think you can get it,
Come on and get it."

And everything suddenly is all right in the Jody Sticker household.

--Daddy B. Nice


About Jody Sticker

Jody Sticker (Gerry Roberts) was born in Montgomery, Alabama. His debut disc, 5 Minutes, was released by Mardi Gras Records in 2005. The album boasted first-rate production and arrangements distinguished by outstanding keyboard and horn riffs. The vocals were understated and muted, lending an air of street-wise authenticity to the songs.

"Five Minutes" was the undisputed hit from the CD. It gained widespread airplay on all chitlin' circuit radio outlets. "Hickory Log" was the follow-up single on most Stations of the Deep South, although it didn't gain the notoriety and popularity of "Five Minutes."

"Five Minutes" was honored with the lead-off track on the Mardi Gras sampler, Down South Party Mix (2005). A new Jody Sticker track, "Jump Up In It," was featured on the 2006 Mardi Gras sampler, Southern Soul Now!


Song's Transcendent Moment

"Let me kiss you real quick.
Let me lick it just a little bit.
Let me stroke it for a minute.
Stand up in it for two minutes.
All I need--five minutes."


Tidbits

1.

"Stand up in it," from the "Five Minutes" chorus, is yet another reference to Theodis Ealey's hit song, "Stand Up In It," which is quickly becoming the most ubiquitous phrase in the Southern Soul lyrical lexicon.

2.

September 17, 2007. I'm informed by a fan that Jody Sticker did release at least one other CD prior to Five Minutes. No other information on it as yet. DBN.

3.

(Reprinted from Daddy B. Nice's CD Reviews Page)

September 29, 2009:

JODY STICKER: Mr. Booty Do Right (CDS) Four Stars **** Distinguished effort. Should please old fans and gain new.

Jody Sticker has until now been a pretty marginal Southern Soul performer, hovering in the "nosebleed" seats of Daddy B. Nice's Top 100 Southern Soul Artists even as others (Willie B., Frederick Brinson) have fallen out. The reason for that tenacious hold on the slippery edge of the chart has fallen chiefly on one Jody Sticker song, the slow but hooky "Five Minutes," a low-key, chitlin' circuit-savvy, domestic tale about getting a "quickie" before the company arrives. The man wants to do it, the woman doesn't--but she relents. "Come on and get it if you think you can get it," she says at the end, with as much snarling skepticism as sexual heat. The song is humorous and self-effacing.

But while 5 Minutes the CD had a second potential (but never realized) Southern Soul single, "Hickory Log," there wasn't anything to match the firepower--or predict the wealth of material--on Mr. Booty Do Right.

With strong assistance from Sir Charles Jones (about which more later), cameos by Mel Waiters and Kenne' Wayne, and #1 and #2-ranked Daddy B. Nice Top 10 Southern Soul Singles ("Roll That Thang," "Booty Do Right"), the new album represents a substantial step forward for Jody Sticker.

Jody Sticker may be the worst singer since Bob Dylan. Don't get me wrong--your Daddy B. Nice is a huge Bob Dylan fan. But if you have any doubt that Jody Sticker is one of the sorriest soul singers ever, you'll know what I'm talking about the minute Mel Waiters chimes in on a verse of "I'm Movin' In." Mel Waiters can sing.

But like Dylan, the singing doesn't matter much if the songs work, and in Jody Sticker's case--deadpan, straight-faced, melancholic and at times morbid takes on the world--the songs almost always do.

Melancholic? Morbid? It seems unreasonable when you consider that Jody's very persona--"jody stick-er"--and the bulk of his songs are about sex, normally an upbeat activity. And yet, when Sticker uncharacteristically laughs a time or two on "Booty Do Right," it's a "techno" laugh. It doesn't seem to come from real life--it seems out of place coming from a performer who eschews anything bubbly and optimistic.

With his ultra-slow tempos and his languorous melodies, Jody Sticker is actually closer to being the Leonard Cohen of Southern Soul.

The ultimate goal in Sticker's songs, like Cohen's, is an intensity of atmosphere, a natural mystery and awe in the seemingly commonplace, if you can only calm down and stay quiet enough to absorb it. The prize for the artist is in the overall presentation of the material, not in the vocal.

With its subtle hook and sophisticated arrangement, "Booty Do Right" (the CD's title cut) is a prime example. It's the first song since the death of Senator Jones to resurrect the sound of Sir Charles Jones and The Love Doctor and the gold-standard material they put out on the Mardi Gras and Hep'Me labels at the turn of the century, in the pre-motorcycle-crash days when a residue of revenge still put bite into everything Sir Charles did.

"Booty Do Right's" distinctive synthesizer fills--straight out of the Sir Charles vocabulary on Jones' own "Tell Me How You Want It" and The Love Doctor's "You Got To Roll It Slow" and "Moaning and Groaning"--represent a huge chunk of creative territory reclaimed from what was beginning to look like Southern Soul oblivion.

The Sir Charles influence doesn't end there. If you listen closely to "Mama's Love," you'll hear the bass line to "Slow Roll It," the Love Doctor classic that remains arguably Sir Charles' finest piece of songwriting. Sir Charles also shares vocals with Jody Sticker on "Roll That Thang," a super-evocative sexual plaint, and "Sacrifice For Love," which sounds like a direct out-take from a Sir Charles album.

Sticker's vocals, fragile but convincing, are carried along by strong bass lines, drums and sumptous string and keyboard washes. Backup singer Keva Dixon sounds like vintage La'Keisha Burks, and even the backgrounds, especially on the marvelous "Booty Do Right," recall the gospel-tinged arrangements from the heyday of Senator Jones.

"I Can't Show My Hand" is most reminiscent of "5 Minutes," with a plodding but beguiling beat and a dialogue with seemingly the same woman Jody talks to on "5 Minutes."

"Roll That Thang," with its Leonard Cohen-like chord progressions and its insistence on a solemn, processional time signature, is destined for great things, if Southern Soul deejays aren't put off by the crawling tempo. Sir Charles sings "Make it go round and round" in the background while the keyboards swirl in languid circles.

"Kitty Missing, Kitty Loose," "Sugar Daddy, Love Daddy," and "Sex Release" all start slowly (literally and figuratively) but grow in stature with each new listening. As always, the arrangements lend a sheen to the songs that very few Southern Soul artists have been able to capture.

"Party Starter" may be the ultimate proof of how contradictory Jody Sticker's recording persona is. No one would ever pick this guy to start a party. He's too downbeat, he's too reticent, he doesn't even seem to relish the spotlight. And yet there is no denying "Party Starter," like all the songs on the album, is supremely seductive.

Jody Sticker is kind of an ultimate Southern Soul insider, trafficking in themes and subject matter that may go over the head of anyone not schooled by years of listening to the rhythm and blues of the Deep South. He remains an enigma in many respects, but an enigma who now owns a showcase collection of songs that any Southern Soul star would be proud to have under his belt.

--Daddy B. Nice

Bargain-Priced Mr. Booty Do Right CD

Daddy B. Nice Artist Guide to Jody Sticker

4.

February 1, 2010: Update

Whew! When it comes to Jody Sticker, there's a lot to report. This once, one-time-hit, more-or-less anonymous Southern Soul artist has gained respect and newfound popularity with his
Mr. Booty Do Right album on high-profile CDS Records. The surprisingly elaborate and atmospheric CD was reviewed on Daddy B. Nice's CD Reviews in 2009 and is also posted below. (Scroll down to Tidbits #3.)

Three of the songs from the album charted on Daddy B. Nice's "Breaking" Southern Soul Singles during the year: Booty Do Right, Party Starter, and Roll That Thang.

And Jody picked up one of the most coveted awards of the year, nailing down a spot in Daddy B. Nice's Top 25 Southern Soul Singles of 2009 with "Booty Do Right." That honor is posted here in its entirety:

22. Mr. Booty Do Right ---------------Jody Sticker

As much as I like it, I've never been able to figure out the song--the structure of the thing--the thing that makes it work. It reminds me of turn-of-century Mardi Gras and Hep'Me Records--vintage nostalgia--and that's Sir Charles on background vocals.

It also has Sir Charles in the studio, his wizardry with the strings and special synthesizer effects recalling early Hep'Me. As with Sir Charles' work with L. J. Echols, the contrast of the arrangement with the vocal by Jody Sticker is dizzyingly contrapuntal.

Speaking of the vocal. . . In a CD review of the album earlier this year, I called Jody Sticker "one of the sorriest soul singers ever," which may have ruffled a few feathers. But that was in the context of calling Bob Dylan--one of my very favorite artists--one of the worst singers ever. I was trying to make the point that you do not go to these artists for their vocals.

Now if you're talking about a specific album, like the super-soulful Blonde On Blonde, I'd have to say Dylan (a Jimmy Reed disciple) was absolutely great, even with his limited--or shall we say, odd--vocal equipment. The same goes for Jody Sticker on "Mr. Booty Do Right." He's absolutely right-on and terrific: the track could not be sung any better.

In summation, this is one of the oddest songs by one of the oddest singers in Southern Soul music, but I have a sneaky feeling its shape may become more discernible as time goes on and that the future may consider "Mr. Booty Do Right" one of the very best songs of 2009.

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Bargain-Priced Mr. Booty Do Right CD, MP3's

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. . . . Listening to the entire album again recently for the first time since the review, I'm happy to report that it's aged well. The "distinguished effort" I gave the CD sounds more than justified and in retrospect the nickname of "the Leonard Cohen of Southern Soul" is still apt.

There may be even more singles here. I'm liking "Sugar Daddy Love Daddy," which I'm going to rename "Sugar Daddy Man," because that's the way it sounds in the song, and thus makes more sense as a title. Close readers may see where I'm going with this line of thought. Watch for the tune on Daddy B. Nice's Top 10 "Breaking" Singles for February.

Booty Do Right's a quirky vision all right--on first impression offbeat to downbeat--and perhaps not for everyone, but what did you expect from the author of "Five Minutes"? The vision is also like being in a good mood on a rainy day: it's laced with beauty.

--Daddy B. Nice

5.

November 20, 2010:

JODY STICKER: Make It Move (CDS) Two Stars ** Dubious. Not Much Here.


"Make It Move," the title cut from Jody Sticker's latest CD, was intended to be the first single from Sticker's new disc, but it has languished far from where the top hits do battle.

The reason isn't hard to discern. The center of the song (where the lead vocal should captivate the listener) is a vacuum. Jody Sticker's inadequacies as a vocalist--thin, weak, "down" to the point of being morbid--sabotage it.

This tattered and taciturn approach to making music worked on "5 Minutes," the novelty song that made Jody Sticker's name. In that song Sticker talked, wisely concealing his inability to carry a tune as a conventional singer.

The humor of the domestic situation described in the tune ("Can we get a quickie in before the company arrives?") also lent itself to the desultory attitude of the husband who insisted "five minutes" would be enough to get the job done.

Not so on a conventional song requiring straight-ahead, aggressive charisma such as "Make It Move."

"You Make My House A Home," which coasts on the subtle, slow-jam background keyboard riff you heard on the Mr. Booty Do Right album, is another example. What does it say about your vocal when the background atmosphere stands out more?

The artist Bigg Robb, vocally-challenged himself, understood this from the beginning. He brought in talent to fill the musical areas in which he didn't excel, and--not surprisingly--he's had success.

Songwriters like Andre' Lee and El' Willie have tried to become full-fledged performers with varying degrees of success.

For instance, El' Willie (who wrote Theodis Ealey's "Stand Up In It") puts out increasingly private LP's filled with under-developed songs that are really not much more than demos. Willie has a great voice, but he seems to lack the will or the skill to choose one great song and finish it in a convincing, audience-attracting manner.

Andre' Lee writes very good songs and, thanks particularly to his most popular single ever--"One Night Stand"--is making a bid in 2010 to become a genuine performer. He's singing live in various chitlin' circuit venues, but he still faces an uphill climb due to his one-dimensionally smooth style.

But most songwriter/producer talents of Gerry Roberts' (aka Jody Sticker's) quality eschew the spotlight, and for good reason. In R&B great singers abound. They're a dime a dozen. If you can't really sing, you don't have a chance of standing out.

"Cheating Game" exposes the other flaw in the "Jody Sticker" package. The music is unfailingly depressing. Even on a potentially sunny song like "(It's) The Little Things (That Count)," you feel like you're in the shade of a mortuary tent with a stiff, cold wind blowing.

"I Know How To Treat My Lady" features the same, funereal tempo and the same, fragile, throaty vocal, and just when you're wishing all you ever heard from Jody Sticker was "5 Minutes," he provides a "5 Minute"-like song ("Give That Money Up") with a more novelty-leaning, talking style.

"Brother Buck Naked"--a great title--has the makings of a pretty decent tune, but Jody Sticker doesn't take it far enough. He needs more firepower. "Placetaker" and "Blues Southern Soul Haunted House" simply seal the fate for this CD. Let the tombstone fall, R.I.P.

Sticker's "Booty Do Right" CD held promise that Jody Sticker was going to "break out" as a bona fide, popular, chitlin'-circuit artist.

With songs like "Booty Do Right," "Party Starter" (a duet with a female backup singer), and the high-profile pairing with Sir Charles Jones on "Roll That Thang," Roberts indicated he was intent on taking his music to the next level, and that he might even be able to do it in spite of his "low ceiling" as a vocalist.

Make It Move squanders the good will built up by Mr. Booty Do Right and then some, and no song embodies that loss as much as "Step On My Own Heart."

Here is a song whose raw material is first-rate. You even hear the song re-playing in your mind long after hearing it. The catch is you don't want to hear it. The rendering by Jody Sticker presents the same whiney vocal, the same syrupey-slow background, as the rest of the CD. You can't get to the real passion at the center of the song, if there is any. It's more like a teenager's basement tape of his or her first crush.

On the evidence of this CD, Gerry Roberts aka Jody Sticker is better suited to being a writer/arranger/producer. It is an honorable and profitable profession--being in constant demand--and one that includes such singing-challenged legends as Senator Jones, Frederick Knight, Harrison Calloway, and George Jackson, not to mention young guns such as Bruce Billups, Jonothan Burton and Eric Perkins.

Think of what Gerry Roberts/Jody Sticker--or for that matter, El' Willie or Andre' Lee--could do for Reggie P., for instance, teaming a great writer/producer with a great singer who, like most singers, lacks good material and arranging/producing skills. What great strides might not be taken? What great songs might not be created?

Is the Jody Sticker thing (which is really just a watered-down imitation of only one aspect of Sir Charles Jones's catalog, the slow-motion "weeper") really the best and most fulfilling career path?

Young "geniuses" like Jody Sticker would do well to take a step back and look at the big picture. How can they really influence the sound of Southern Soul? How can they really find the part they were meant to play?

--Daddy B. Nice

Bargain-Priced Make It Move CD

Comparison-Priced Make It Move CD



If You Liked. . . You'll Love

If you loved Dr. John's "Right Place, Wrong Time," you'll love Jody Sticker's "Five Minutes."


Honorary "B" Side

"Mr. Booty Do Right"



5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 
Sample or Buy Five Minutes by Jody Sticker
Five Minutes


CD: 5 Minutes
Label: Mardi Gras

Sample or Buy
5 Minutes


5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 
Sample or Buy Mr. Booty Do Right by Jody Sticker
Mr. Booty Do Right


CD: Mr. Booty Do Right
Label: CDS

Sample or Buy
Mr. Booty Do Right


5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 
Sample or Buy Roll That Thang by Jody Sticker
Roll That Thang


CD: Mr. Booty Do Right
Label: CDS

Sample or Buy
Mr. Booty Do Right


4 Stars 4 Stars 4 Stars 4 Stars 
Sample or Buy Hickory Log by Jody Sticker
Hickory Log


CD: 5 Minutes
Label: Mardi Gras

Sample or Buy
5 Minutes


4 Stars 4 Stars 4 Stars 4 Stars 
Sample or Buy Lovers' Reunion by Jody Sticker
Lovers' Reunion


CD: 5 Minutes

Sample or Buy
5 Minutes


4 Stars 4 Stars 4 Stars 4 Stars 
Sample or Buy Party Starter by Jody Sticker
Party Starter


CD: Mr. Booty Do Right
Label: CDS

Sample or Buy
Mr. Booty Do Right


3 Stars 3 Stars 3 Stars 
Sample or Buy Jump Up In It by Jody Sticker
Jump Up In It


CD: Southern Soul Now
Label: Mardi Gras

Sample or Buy
Southern Soul Now


3 Stars 3 Stars 3 Stars 
Sample or Buy Love Whuppin' by Jody Sticker
Love Whuppin'


CD: 5 Minutes
Label: Mardi Gras

Sample or Buy
5 Minutes


3 Stars 3 Stars 3 Stars 
Sample or Buy Slow Kiss It by Jody Sticker
Slow Kiss It


CD: Slow Kiss It
Label: Silent M

Sample or Buy
Slow Kiss It


3 Stars 3 Stars 3 Stars 
Sample or Buy Squeeze It And Hold It by Jody Sticker
Squeeze It And Hold It


CD: 5 Minutes
Label: Mardi Gras

Sample or Buy
5 Minutes


3 Stars 3 Stars 3 Stars 
Sample or Buy Step On My Own Heart by Jody Sticker
Step On My Own Heart


CD: Make It Move
Label: CDS

Sample or Buy
Make It Move


3 Stars 3 Stars 3 Stars 
Sample or Buy Sugar Daddy Man by Jody Sticker
Sugar Daddy Man


CD: Mr. Booty Do Right
Label: CDS

Sample or Buy
Mr. Booty Do Right


3 Stars 3 Stars 3 Stars 
Sample or Buy That's How I Wanna Do It by Jody Sticker
That's How I Wanna Do It


CD: 5 Minutes
Label: Mardi Gras

Sample or Buy
5 Minutes


3 Stars 3 Stars 3 Stars 
Sample or Buy When You Wake Up by Jody Sticker
When You Wake Up


CD: 5 Minutes
Label: Mardi Gras

Sample or Buy
5 Minutes


3 Stars 3 Stars 3 Stars 
Sample or Buy You're Gonna Need Me by Jody Sticker
You're Gonna Need Me


CD: 5 Minutes
Label: Mardi Gras

Sample or Buy
5 Minutes


2 Stars 2 Stars 
Sample or Buy Make It Move by Jody Sticker
Make It Move


CD: Make It Move
Label: CDS

Sample or Buy
Make It Move


2 Stars 2 Stars 
Sample or Buy Snapper by Jody Sticker
Snapper


CD: 5 Minutes
Label: Mardi Gras

Sample or Buy
5 Minutes


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